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When Science Communication Fails

-Featured Image By Gabrielle Cox Flashback to late March 2020. An overwhelming majority of businesses and schools are closing their doors because of a new virus spreading across the globe. Many are confused, scared, and panicking as toilet paper and masks are selling out. Where does everyone look for answers? Most turned to their phones and televisions as a way […]

Can Science Be Anti-Colonial?

Scientists are trained to think in very specific ways, to focus on the individual by disconnecting our subject from the complex factors that affect it. We do this in an effort to make it easier to understand our discoveries and avoid bias. This method has brought us a wealth of knowledge about our world: helping to cure and prevent disease, develop technologies that connect us in meaningful ways, and identify and help to solve our problems. But, too often, it is seen as the only or best way of knowing. I argue that is not the case.

Ecoanxiety: Climate Crisis and Mental Meltdown

Have you ever learned something about the state of the environment that made you want to give up on life? Maybe it was the latest statistics on biodiversity loss, the realization of how much plastic is and will be in landfills for thousands of years, or maybe it was the latest and bleakest climate reports forecasting a future of environmental […]

Fingerprinting: A Word of Precaution

Fingerprints are like social security numbers—they hold the key to your identity. No two fingerprints are alike, and biometric scanners can even differentiate twins, no matter how similar they are. Biometrics not only reinforce security but also establish accessible and reliable records of employees’ work hours. Such technology eliminates fraudulent input of hours. Biometrics are also used in air travel. […]

Race and Genetics: The Discussion Continues

Do genetic test results actually mean anything?? This was the question in my head after my professor suggested the answer was “no” offhand in a lecture for the class I was taking: The History of Capitalism (which I do recommend, if it’s taught again). I love both science and the humanities. But I’ve come to discover how different the two […]